Sharks Official Sponsor

Communication Guide

A GUIDE FOR PARENT / COACH COMMUNICATION
PROVIDED BY
ST JAMES HIGH SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION  &  ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT

Paula Lee, Athletic Director                   Vann Pennell, Principal

Parent-Coach Relationship

Both parenting and coaching are extremely difficult roles.  By establishing an understanding of each role, we are better able to accept the actions of each other and provide a greater benefit to our children.  Parents, when your child becomes involved in our program, you have the right to understand what expectations will be placed on your child.  This begins with clear communications from the coach of your program.

Communications You Should Expect From Your Child’s Coach

Coach’s Philosophy
Expectation and goals the coach has for your child as well as for the team/season.
Team requirements, special equipment, strength and conditioning programs.
Procedure if your child is injured during participation
Game/practice schedule and updates
Team rules, guidelines and consequences for infractions
Lettering Criteria
Team Selection Process

COMMUNICATIONS COACHES EXPECT FROM ATHLETES / PARENTS

Any concerns expressed DIRECTLY to the coach.
Advance notification of any schedule conflicts.
Advance notification of illness or injury-when possible.

 

 It is the goal of everyone that each St James Student– athlete will experience some of the most rewarding moments of their lives while participating in our programs.  It is important to understand that there also may be times when things do not go the way you and your child wish.  When this occurs, discussion with the coach is encouraged.  It is the first  and most integral step to understanding and resolution. 

APPROPRIATE CONCERNS TO DISCUSS WITH COACHES

Treatment of child
Ways to help your child
Concerns about your child’s behavior

INAPPROPRIATE CONCERNS TO DISCUSS WITH COACHES

Playing Time
Team Strategy
Play Calling
Other Student Athletes

WE ARE THEIR ROLE MODELS!

The critical factor in determining whether your child has a positive experience is the quality of their adult leaders-their PARENTS and COACHES.

COACH’S CODE OF CONDUCT

Promote sportsmanship and foster good character by teaching, enforcing, advocating and modeling the 6 PILLARS OF CHARACTER.
Trustworthiness, Fairness, Respect, Caring, Responsibility, Citizenship

Conduct you team and yourself in a manner that demonstrates emotional maturity and productive behavior.

Observe and enforce the spirit as well as the letter of the rules.

Always exemplify professional behavior to officials and the opposing team.

PARENT’S CODE OF CONDUCT

Control your emotions at games and events. This is high school athletics and there is a lot more at stake than wins and losses.

Be realistic with child’s physical ability and avoid making comparisons with other members of the team.

Respect your child’s coaches.  Communicate with them in a positive way and encourage others to do the same. Be a positive role model

IF YOU HAVE A CONCERN TO DISCUSS WITH A COACH, HERE ARE THE PROCEDURES AND THE ORDER THAT SHOULD BE FOLLOWED

Call the Coach and make an appointment

If the Coach cannot be reached call the Athletic Director, Paula Lee. She will set up the meeting for you.

Please DO NOT attempt to confront a coach before or after a contest or practice.  These can be emotional times for both the parent and the coach. Meetings of this nature usually do not promote positive resolution.

THE NEXT STEP

WHAT can a parent do if the meeting with the coach did not provide a satisfactory resolution?
Call and set up an appointment with the Athletic Director to discuss the situation.
At this meeting the appropriate next step can be determined

 

TEN REASONS TO SHOW GOOD SPORTSMANSHIP

10. Taunting, trash talk and intimidating behavior have no place in high school sports or any level

9. Your admission allows you to watch the performance of highly impressionable 15-18 year old student-athletes; not a license to abuse coaches and officials, players or other spectators

8. You want others to treat you the way you want to be treated– and how many of us want to be treated with disrespect?

7.  We need more positive role models for our student-athletes.

6. People don’t always remember the final score– but they always remember the fan in Section 3 who made a fool out of themselves.

5. A national survey indicates student-athletes play high school sports to have fun– not to be number one!

4. Coaches and officials are also teachers.  Why should you harass them in their classroom?

3.  Sportsmanship begins with you

2. Little eyes are watching

1. It’s simply……….

THE RIGHT THING TO DO !!!